Mining Bitcoin Using Old Computers and Retro Gaming ...

ECC in Intel core 7-8th gen

Hello. Im trying to build home NAS. Looking at mainboards with either c236 or c246 chipset. It supports ECC memory. Intel ARK shows MAANY Intel Core, Pentiums series supporting ECC memory.
But MANY forums and so on always say "oh only Xeons support ecc". Intel forum itself dont give clear answer. I dont want to buy ECC mainboard, ecc ram and then cpu that would not work... Maybe when Intel states ECC supported they mean that cpu works but ecc feature is not used? Xeon is too overpriced for me and i only use it for file sharing not to mine bitcoin :D
Can anyone confirm that 7,8th gen intel cpus support ECC feature?
submitted by T-m-X to intel [link] [comments]

[USA-IL][H]Super Micro Server w/10x4TB WD Reds, 6U GPU mining chassis, Lian Li PC-06s case, EVGA Supernova 1600w PSU, some free stuff[W] PayPal, Local Cash

UPDATE:
ORIGINAL: Timestamps: https://imgur.com/a/KtaDdY6

Qty Item Price
1 Supermicro SC846 Dual Xeon e5-2650v3 Custom Server w/10x 4TB Reds, 24x drive sleds $800 OBO Local Cash
1 0 Lian Li PC-06S includes screws and rubber HDD mounts, etc etc. Made a minor mod to the case to fit AIO at the top. $100 + shipping/packaging, local preferred
1 0 EVGA Supernova 1600 G2 PayPal $200 shipped OBO
1 0 Pentium core i3-7100 w/cooler free + shipping
2 0 (cooler & box only) Ryzen 7 2700x free + shipping
1 6U GPU Bitcoin Mining Rig Server Case – w/6 Chassis fans w/dropdown backplate, 6x PCI-E 16x to 1x Risers & USB cables $100 + shipping/packaging, local preferred
1 Server in 10 bay Rosewill Chassis Local/Cash only
Supermicro SC846 Dual Xeon e5-2650v3 Custom Server
Everything is in Excellent Physical and Working Condition. Drives were powered on 24/7 from
Parts List Description
Supermicro SC846 Chassis (24 bay) Includes all 24 drive sleds
Supermicro PDB Upgraded Power distributor board for dual CPU
Supermicro 920w Super Quiet The regular PSU is too loud so upgraded
2x Intel Xeon e5-2650v3 Dual engineering samples 10c/20t each
2x Noctua NH-U9DXi4
4x 8GB Samsung DDR4-2133 REG ECC 32GB REG ECC Memory perfect for ZFS
3x LS 9211-8i Flashed to IT firmware
5x Noctua AF-A8 PWM Upgraded chassis fans to Noctuas
10 x WD 4TB Red (not shucked) Purchased 11-2014 from Newegg/Amazom
1x NvidiaGT 1030

EVGA Supernova 1600 G2
Standard cables:
Extra Cables:
submitted by november84 to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

[USA-CA] [H] Cheap Intel i3 4330 Bundle (2x CPUs, Board, 10gb RAM, GPU) [W] Verified PayPal

EDIT: Sold for $65 to fwipsy without the HD4870 Video Card
I'm trying to clear out all of my remaining DDR3/1150 parts in one bundle and have priced it accordingly.
Everything except the i3 CPU and the video card in this bundle, came from a storage locker auction that appears to have been from a low-end bitcoin mining rig. The i3 CPU was previously running in my TS140 before I upgraded it and the HD4870 was just laying around looking for a new home. Everything works like it should and has been tested together. Just add your case, power supply and drive.
Note: The Pentium G3320 doesn't support 1600MHz RAM, so if you want to use that CPU with the included parts, you'll need to use the Crucial or PNY RAM.
TIMESTAMPS

CATEGORY DESCRIPTION CONDITION
Motherboard AsRock H81 Pro BTC Used / Working / Box Included
CPU Intel Core i3 4330 3.5GHz Dual Core (54w TDP) Used / Working / Installed
CPU Intel Pentium G3320 3.0GHz Dual Core Used / Working
Cooler Stock Intel Cooler Used / Working
RAM Crucial DDR3 1333MHz 4GB Kit (2x2gb) Used / Working
RAM G.Skill DDR3 1600MHz 2GB Kit (2x1gb) Used / Working / In Packaging
RAM PNY 4GB DDR3 1333MHz (1 Stick) Used / Working
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD4870 512mb Video Card Used / Working
Price: $80 Delivered via Verified Paypal [Sold for $65 to fwipsy without the HD4870 Video Card] (includes USPS Priority shipping within the lower 48 states)
Location: 92399
If interested, please leave a comment and PM me.
submitted by flyboy34 to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

hahhaa doom go brrrr

The date was June 10, 2018. The sun was shining, the grass was growing, and the birds were singing. At least, that’s what I assumed. Being a video game and tech obsessed teenager, I was indoors, my eyes glued to my computer monitor like a starving lion spying on a plump gazelle. I was watching the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) 2018 broadcast on twitch.com, a popular streaming website. Video game developers use E3 as an annual opportunity to showcase any upcoming video game projects to the public. So far, the turnout had been disappointing. Much to my disappointment, multiple game developers failed to unveil anything of actual sustenance for an entire two hours. A graphical update here, a bug fix there. Issues that should have been fixed at every game’s initial launch, not a few months after release. Feeling hopeless, I averted my eyes from my computer monitor to check Reddit (a social media app/website) if there were any forum posts that I had yet to see. But then, I heard it. The sound of music composer Mick Gordon’s take on the original “DooM” theme, the awesome combination of metal and electronic music. I looked up at my screen and gasped. Bethesda Softworks and id software had just announced “DOOM: Eternal”, the fifth addition in the “DooM” video game series. “DOOM: Eternal” creative director Hugo Martin promised that the game would feel more powerful than it’s 2016 predecessor, there would be twice as many enemy types, and the doom community would finally get to see “hell on earth”. (Martin) As a fan of “DOOM (2016)”, I was ecstatic. The original “DooM” popularized the “First Person Shooter (FPS)” genre, and I wished I wouldn’t have to wait to experience the most recent entry in the series. “DOOM(1993)” was a graphical landmark when it originally released, yet nowadays it looks extremely dated, especially compared to “DOOM: Eternal”. What advancements in computer technology perpetuated this graphical change? Computers became faster, digital storage increased, and computer peripherals were able to display higher resolution and refresh rates.
“DooM” 1993 graphics example:
📷(Doom | Doom Wiki)
“DOOM: Eternal” graphics example:
📷
(Bailey)
In their video “Evolution Of DOOM”, the video game YouTube Channel “gameranx” says that on December 10, 1993, a file titled “DOOM1_0.zip” was uploaded on the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server of the University of Wisconsin. This file, two megabytes in size, contained the video game “DooM” created by the game development group “id Software”. (Evolution of DOOM) While not the first game in the “First Person Shooter” (FPS) genre, “DooM” popularized the genre, to the point of any other FPS game being referred to as a “Doom Clone” until the late 1990s. (Doom clones | Doom Wiki) The graphics of the original “DooM” is definitely a major downgrade compared to today’s graphical standards, but keep in mind that the minimum system requirements of “DooM”, according to the article “Doom System Requirements” on gamesystemrequirements.com, was eight megabytes of ram, an Intel Pentium or AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) Athlon 486 processor cycling at sixty-six megahertz or more, and an operating system that was Windows 95 or above. (Doom System Requirements) In case you don’t speak the language of technology (although I hope you learn a thing or two at the end of this essay), the speed and storage capacity is laughable compared to the specifications of today. By 1993, the microprocessor, or CPU (Central Processing Unit) had been active for the past twenty-two years after replacing the integrated circuit in 1971, thanks to the creators of the microprocessor, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore who were also the founder of CPU manufacturer “Intel”. Gordon Moore also created “Moore’s law”, which states “The number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months”. (Moore) Sadly, according to writer and computer builder Steve Blank in his article “The End of More - The Death of Moore’s Law”, this law would end at around 2005, thanks to the basic laws of physics. (Blank) 1993 also marked an important landmark for Intel, who just released the first “Pentium” processor which was capable of a base clock of 60 MHz (megahertz). The term “base clock” refers to the default speed of a CPU. This speed can be adjusted via the user’s specifications, and “MHz” refers to one million cycles per second. A cycle is essentially one or more problems that the computer solves. The more cycles the CPU is running at, the more problems get solved. Intel would continue upgrading their “Pentium” lineup until January 4, 2000 when they would release the “Celeron” processor, with a base clock of 533 MHz. Soon after, on June 19, 2000, rival CPU company AMD would release their “Duron” processor which had a base clock of 600 MHz, with a maximum clock of 1.8 GHz (Gigahertz). One GHz is equal to 1,000 MHz. Intel and AMD had established themselves as the two major CPU companies in the 1970s in Silicon Valley. Both companies had been bitter rivals since then, trading figurative blows in the form of competitive releases, discounts, and “one upmanship” to this day. Moving on to April 21, 2005 when AMD released the first dual-core CPU, the “Athlon 64 X2 3800+”. The notable feature of this CPU, besides a 2.0 GHz base clock and a 3.8 maximum clock, was that it was the first CPU to have two cores. A CPU core is a CPU’s processor. The more cores a CPU has, the more tasks it can perform per cycle, thus maximizing it’s efficiency. Intel wouldn’t respond until January 9, 2006, when they released their dual-core processor, the “Core 2 Duo Processor E6320”, with a base clock of 1.86 GHz. (Computer Processor History) According to tech entrepreneur Linus Sebastian in his YouTube videos “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2009 - 2014 (Part 1)” and “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2015 - 2019 (Part 2)”, AMD would have the upper hand over Intel until 2011, when Intel released the “Sandy Bridge” CPU microarchitecture, which was faster and around the same price as AMD’s current competing products. (Sebastian) The article “What is Microarchitecture?” on the website Computer Hope defines microarchitecture as “a hardware implementation of an ISA (instruction set architecture). An ISA is a structure of commands and operations used by software to communicate with hardware. A microarchitecture is the hardware circuitry that implements one particular ISA”. (What is Microarchitecture?) Microarchitecture is also referred to as what generation a CPU belongs to. Intel would continue to dominate the high-end CPU market until 2019, when AMD would “dethrone” Intel with their third generation “Ryzen” CPU lineup. The most notable of which being the “Ryzen 3950x”, which had a total of sixteen cores, thirty-two threads, a base clock of 3.5 GHz, and a maximum clock of 4.7 GHz. (Sebastian) The term “thread” refers to splitting one core into virtual cores, via a process known as “simultaneous multithreading”. Simultaneous multithreading allows one core to perform two tasks at once. What CPU your computer has is extremely influential for how fast your computer can run, but for video games and other types of graphics, there is a special type of processor that is designed specifically for the task of “rendering” (displaying) and generating graphics. This processor unit is known as the graphics processing unit, or “GPU”. The term “GPU” wasn’t used until around 1999, when video cards started to evolve beyond the literal generation of two-dimensional graphics and into the generation of three-dimensional graphics. According to user “Olena” in their article “A Brief History of GPU”, The first GPU was the “GeForce 256”, created by GPU company “Nvidia'' in 1999. Nvidia promoted the GeForce 256 as “A single-chip processor with integrated transform, lighting, triangle setup/clipping, and rendering engines that is capable of processing a minimum of 10 million polygons per second”. (Olena) Unlike the evolution of CPUs, the history of GPUs is more one sided, with AMD playing a game of “catchup” ever since Nvidia overtook AMD in the high-end GPU market in 2013. (Sebastian) Fun fact, GPUs aren’t used only for gaming! In 2010, Nvidia collaborated with Audi to power the dashboards and increase the entertainment and navigation systems in Audi’s cars! (Olena) Much to my (and many other tech enthusiasts), GPUs would increase dramatically in price thanks to the “bitcoin mania” around 2017. This was, according to senior editor Tom Warren in his article “Bitcoin Mania is Hurting PC Gamers By Pushing Up GPU Prices'' on theverge.com, around an 80% increase in price for the same GPU due to stock shortages. (Warren) Just for context, Nvidia’s “flagship” gpu in 2017 was the 1080ti, the finest card of the “pascal” microarchitecture. Fun fact, I have this card. The 1080ti launched for $699, with the specifications of a base clock of 1,481 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,582 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR5X Vram (Memory that is exclusive to the GPU) according to the box it came in. Compare this to Nvidia’s most recent flagship GPU, the 2080ti of Nvidia’s followup “Turing” microarchitecture, another card I have. This GPU launched in 2019 for $1,199. The 2080ti’s specifications, according to the box it came in included a base clock of 1,350 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,545 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR6 Vram.
A major reason why “DooM” was so popular and genius was how id software developer John Carmack managed to “fake” the three-dimensional graphics without taking up too much processing power, hard drive space, or “RAM” (Random access memory), a specific type of digital storage. According to the article “RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition” on the website TechTerms, Ram is also known as “volatile” memory, because it is much faster than normal storage (which at the time took the form of hard-drive space), and unlike normal storage, only holds data when the computer is turned on. A commonly used analogy is that Ram is the computer’s short-term memory, storing temporary files to be used by programs, while hard-drive storage is the computer’s long term memory. (RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition) As I stated earlier, in 1993, “DooM” required 8 megabytes of ram to run. For some context, as of 2020, “DOOM: Eternal” requires a minimum of 8 gigabytes of DDR4 (more on this later) ram to run, with most gaming machines possessing 16 gigabytes of DDR4 ram. According to tech journalist Scott Thornton in his article “What is DDR (Double Data Rate) Memory and SDRAM Memory”, in 1993, the popular format of ram was “SDRAM”. “SDRAM” stands for “Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory”. SDRAM differs from its predecessor, “DRAM” (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by being synchronized with the clock speed of the CPU. DRAM was asynchronous (not synchronized by any external influence), which “posted a problem in organizing data as it comes in so it can be queued for the process it’s associated with”. SDRAM was able to transfer data one time per clock cycle, and it’s replacement in the early 2000s, “DDR SDRAM” (Dual Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) was able to transfer data two times per clock cycle. This evolution of ram would continue to this day. In 2003, DDR2 SDRAM was released, able to transfer four pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2007, DDR3 SDRAM was able to transfer eight pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2014, DDR4 SDRAM still was able to transfer eight pieces of data per cycle, but the clock speed had increased by 600 MHz, and the overall power consumption had been reduced from 3.3 volts for the original SDRAM to 1.2 volts for DDR4. (Thornton)The digital size of each “ram stick” (a physical stick of ram that you would insert into your computer) had also increased, from around two megabytes per stick, to up to 128 gigabytes per stick (although this particular option will cost you around $1,000 per stick depending on the manufacturer) in 2020, although the average stick size is 8 gigabytes. For the average computer nowadays, you can insert up to four ram sticks, although for more high-end systems, you can insert up to sixteen or even thirty-two! Rewind back to 1993, where the original “DooM” took up two megabytes of storage, not to be confused with ram. According to tech enthusiast Rex Farrance in their article “Timeline: 50 Years of Hard Drives”, the average computer at this time had around two gigabytes of storage. Storage took the form of magnetic-optical discs, a combination of the previous magnetic discs and optical discs. (Farrance) This format of storage is still in use today, although mainly for large amounts of rarely used data, while data that is commonly used by programs (including the operating system) is put on solid-state drives, or SSDs. According to tech journalist Keith Foote in their article “A Brief History of Data Storage”, SSDs differed from the HDD by being much faster and smaller, storing data on a flash memory chip, not unlike a USB thumb drive. While SSDs had been used as far back as 1950, they wouldn’t find their way into the average gaming machine until the early 2010s. (Foote) A way to think about SSDs is common knowledge. It doesn’t contain every piece of information you know, it just contains what you use on a daily basis. For example, my computer has around 750 gigabytes of storage in SSDs, and around two terabytes of internal HDD storage. On my SSDs, I have my operating system, my favorite programs and games, and any files that I use frequently. On my HDD, I have everything else that I don’t use on a regular basis.
“DOOM: Eternal” would release on March 20, 2020, four months after it’s original release date on November 22, 2019. And let me tell you, I was excited. The second my clock turned from 11:59 P.M. to 12:00 A.M., I repeatedly clicked my refresh button, desperately waiting to see the words “Coming March 20” transform into the ever so beautiful and elegant phrase: “Download Now”. At this point in time, I had a monitor that was capable of displaying roughly two-million pixels spread out over it’s 27 inch display panel, at a rate of 240 times a second. Speaking of monitors and displays, according to the article “The Evolution of the Monitor” on the website PCR, at the time of the original “DooM” release, the average monitor was either a CRT (cathode ray tube) monitor, or the newer (and more expensive) LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor. The CRT monitor was first unveiled in 1897 by the German physicist Karl Ferdinand Braun. CRT monitors functioned by colored cathode ray tubes generating an image on a phosphorescent screen. These monitors would have an average resolution of 800 by 600 pixels and a refresh rate of around 30 frames per second. CRT monitors would eventually be replaced by LCD monitors in the late 2000s. LCD monitors functioned by using two pieces of polarized glass with liquid crystal between them. A backlight would shine through the first piece of polarized glass (also known as substrate). Electrical currents would then cause the liquid crystals to adjust how much light passes through to the second substrate, which creates the images that are displayed. (The Evolution of the Monitor) The average resolution would increase to 1920x1080 pixels and the refresh rate would increase to 60 frames a second around 2010. Nowadays, there are high end monitors that are capable of displaying up to 7,680 by 4,320 pixels, and also monitors that are capable of displaying up to 360 frames per second, assuming you have around $1,000 lying around.
At long last, it had finished. My 40.02 gigabyte download of “DOOM: Eternal” had finally completed, and oh boy, I was ready to experience this. I ran over to my computer, my beautiful creation sporting 32 gigs of DDR4 ram, an AMD Ryzen 7 “3800x” with a base clock of 3.8 GHz, an Nvidia 2080ti, 750 gigabytes of SSD storage and two terabytes of HDD storage. Finally, after two years of waiting for this, I grabbed my mouse, and moved my cursor over that gorgeous button titled “Launch DOOM: Eternal”. Thanks to multiple advancements in the speed of CPUs, the size of ram and storage, and display resolution and refresh rate, “DooM” had evolved from an archaic, pixelated video game in 1993 into the beautiful, realistic and smooth video game it is today. And personally, I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for us.
submitted by Voxel225 to voxelists [link] [comments]

Help with my first deepfake

My gaming rig has a rtx 2080, a 4c/8t i7 and 16gb of ram, I want to make a ~15 second video however I need to be able to use my computer for school.
I also have a decommissioned bitcoin mining rig with 6 gtx 1070ti's, however it only has 4gb of ram and a crappy Pentium cpu.
My only other option is I could put two of the 1070ti's into my computer with some of my extra PCIE risers.
Which of these would be my best option? Would DeepFakeLab even run with 4gb of ram? Any help or advice is greatly appreciated!
submitted by The_Black_Python to SFWdeepfakes [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
______________________
Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
______________________
Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
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Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
______________________
Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
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Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
______________________
Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
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Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
______________________
Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
______________________
Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
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**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

______________________
CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

______________________
MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
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RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
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THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
______________________
POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
______________________
STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
______________________

Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
______________________
______________________
______________________
Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

My Beginnings

Images: https://imgur.com/a/tOFNhlJ

My Current Rack Setup

So, this is the first time I've ever done a post like this to homelab and I wanted to give as much detail as possible.
For this, i'm going to work my way left to right, top to bottom.
submitted by DevelopedLogic to homelab [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Smartphone cpu performance vs x86 CPUs, are smartphone comparable to entry level desktop/netbook/laptop cpu?

Today i was using the geekbench 3 browser to go through the performances of the various snapdragon models (using the list of devices) and when i arrived to the last octa core models i observed that those had more points than intel x86 cpu (for example the atom z3580).
Then i searched for normal intel cpu (desktop/laptop) and i saw that while the octa core snapdragon or exynos were around 5000 points many x86 cpus were not. Heck i thought that a pentium 3 1ghz (from 2000) was still faster than smartphone CPUs for non-trivial computations!
I'm aware that instruction sets are different, ad hoc processing is different too. For example certain ASICs are monstrous for md5 hash (see bitcoin farms), GPUs are great for certain type of parallel computing, while x86 "normal" CPUs are better at something else. So i searched some benchmark that could really squeeze the processing power of general purposes CPU doing some intensive task that comes from real world problems (so math, physics, etc.).
For example computing primes, computing a fractal, testing on sorting algorithms and so on, computing rsa/hashes (for example for crypted transmissions), etc.
Unfortunately i did not find anything of the sort, so, does someone else knows if actual smartphone CPUs are really on par with relatively old desktop/laptop CPUs (even just entry level)?
The only similar "intensive" situation that i can compare is when i play certain games (ex: racing) that i played also long ago on desktop computers, but the comparison is not really fair because it includes GPU abilities, memory, storage (if the app is big) and most importantly the game itself.
edit: people in the thread mention contemporary desktop solution. I think is unlikely that a system on a chip from 2015 can compete with an Intel/amd from 2015. I was meaning more like: does a system on a chip in smartphones of 2016 can outrun x86 CPUs from 2004 for meaningful tasks (math, physics, running webservers, etc.)? CPU from 2006? 2008? etc...
edit2: another interesting perspective is to use embedded computers based on Soc, like raspberry. I may ask in /raspberry and then see how the raspberry compare with SoC in smartphones.
edit3: i just remember that long ago i looked at the top500.org, they used linpack to test clusters. So i searched for linkpack again and i found a guy that is very fond in tests (great job!). Of course i did not test all the available cpu but to have an idea is ok:
http://www.roylongbottom.org.uk/linpack%20results.htm
In brief for single precision on 100x100 problems: The fastest arm tops at 1400 Mflops, while quite decent desktop x86 cpu are around 1800 Mflops.
Of course there are many gaps: which generation of CPU? When? Etc... But the idea is that a snapdragon could be as similar as a 2.4ghz core 2 duo of some years ago (that is nothing poor, it still pretty useful as cpu i would say), with a massive test (optimized or not) is quite surprising.
I would have expected the snapdragon 800 to be 20 times slower or more of a relatively old core 2 due CPU for a linpack test.
submitted by pier4r to Android [link] [comments]

[USA-NJ][H]Sapphire Nitro RX 580 8gb, XFX GTR XXX RX580 4gb, X299 motherboard, Z170/Z270 Motherboard, Supermicro Dual 2011 combo, I7-5820K, Pentium G4400, NZXT Kraken G12, Samsung Gear S2 Smart watch[W]Local cash, google pay, paypal












submitted by turk-fx to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

My Experience: From FX-8350 to R7-1700

Upgrading from an FX-8350 to a R7-1700.
Just a bit about me – I have been building computers since the mid 80’s. I missed the 8-inch floppy disk era, but came on board when dual 5.25” was considered mainstream and a 10-megabyte full-height HDD was the mark of a power user. The first computer I built for my own enjoyment was an AMD X5-133 (a factory overclocked 486 faster than the Pentium-75), and I’ve used a wide variety of systems since then, including a Pentium Pro-200 which served me well in college and a K6-2 which I took to quite a few LAN parties. While I’ve always had Intel notebooks, my PC’s have been AMD for quite some time now. I decided to upgrade my current main machine, which is an FX-8350 with a mild 4.4Ghz overclock. I was using 2x8GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600 and a Sapphire Radeon Fury Nitro. While I know the R5-1600x would be a better bet for a pure gaming build, I have a soft spot for 8-core machines. I had been tempted to pull the trigger on an i7-7700k for a while, but the timing never worked out. But when I found the R7-1700 at a deep discount and an X370 motherboard on the shelf next to it – I couldn’t resist the siren call of a new build.
Here are my thoughts about the process:
AM4 is physically the same as AM3 from a build perspective, except for the mounting holes. I don’t know what was so important about making the holes have different offsets, but this makes it much more difficult to get quality cooling. Not all manufacturers have brackets yet, and I’m still waiting on Cooler Master to release the brackets for my Siedon 240.
The new motherboard feels very different from my AM3 board. My FX-8350 sat on an ASUS M5A99FX Pro R2.0. It was, for lack of a better word, a very workstation-ish board. 4 PCIx16 slots, 10x USB ports (2 of the USB 3.0), triple USB 2.0 front panel headers (and a USB 3.0 front panel header as well), eSATA on the rear panel, beefy VRM and Northbridge cooling, Toslink output for audio, and so on. The board itself is full of tiny components, support chips, and ports. Granted, many of these connectors are outdated (eSATA and USB2.0), and the PCIe is only 2.0 instead of current-gen 3.0, but there is a LOT of connectivity. Few people paired an FX chip with triple of quad-GPU for gaming, but I know a fair number of people used these for bitcoin mining back before there was widespread ASIC support and back then GPU mining was the most cost-effective way to mint cryptocurrency. Extra PCIe slots could be used for dedicated video capture, PCI-based storage, a RAID card, etc... Having 4 full-size slots allows this kind of flexibility. The new motherboard is an Asrock Fatal1ty x370 Gaming K4. It does not feel very workstation-ish at all. It has only two 16x PCIe slots (and when they are both in use they are only 8x), 8 USB ports on the rear panel, and a much less “busy” motherboard. Very few support chips litter its surface. Instead of a workstation component, it feels much more like a luxury consumer product. This is not a bad thing – just something I noticed while building the system. The rear IO shield is red and black to match its gaming aesthetic, it includes things like premium audio (including a very nice headphone amplifier for the front panel connectors), and while it only has 8x USB ports on the back, 6 of them are USB 3.0 and two of them (including a type-C connector) are USB 3.1 gen2. It includes RGB LED’s under the chipset heatsink and three separate RGB LED controller ports (one of which is used for the boxed cooler), Intel gigabit Ethernet, and dual M.2 slots (one of which connected directly to the CPU). It is very different in “feel” from the older ASUS board, even down to things like a shroud for the external connectors and metal-reinforced PCI slots. I must say, its more aggressive appearance and near-empty areas appeal to me. It does, however, funnel the builder into a particular configuration: limited fast storage through the M.2 slots, slow(er) storage through the 6x SATA ports, all external devices should be USB 3. Personally, these limitations didn’t restrict me for this build, since that was how I was going to set it up anyway, but the fewer connectivity choices might cause some pause for others. The only thing I don’t like about this board is the 20 second POST times. 20 seconds every time. Resuming from sleep is very fast, just reboots are slow. That’s really it. I have no substantive complaints other than that – well, and the memory speed limitations – more on that below.
The Wraith Spire cooler is without doubt the best looking box cooler I’ve ever seen. The symmetrical cylinder look, combined with the LED logo and RGB ring are very striking. I can see why many people have asked to order one, though I think for the 1700X and 1800X they are better off without it. I’ll explain why further down.
Initial hardware setup was very easy. I was able to flash to the newest 2.0 BIOS without any hassle using a DOS USB flash boot drive. The 2.0 BIOS has the newest AGESA code from AMD, as well as support for the R5 processors and better DDR4 compatibility. I didn’t want to cheap out on RAM since apparently Ryzen is sensitive to DDR4 speeds for the latency between cores. I bought the cheapest 16GB DDR4-3200 kit I could find (the EVGA SuperSC 2x8GB), for which I paid $115. While I was not able to get it to boot at 3200, I could get 2933 simply by activating XMP, then manually changing the speed from 3200 to 3000. I then tested it with MemTest86 for two complete cycles, which it passed without errors. I have encountered zero memory issues with these RAM sticks running at 2933. Since this motherboard does not officially support DDR4-3200 at all, I figure this is a good outcome. I am curious to know whether anyone has gotten 3200 on this board – that is, whether the lack of 3200 memory on Asrock’s QVL is a marketing issue or an actual hardware limitation – but I didn’t want to spend nearly double that amount in order to get AM4 verified memory (G.Skill’s FlareX), and 2966 seemed fast enough from the benchmark results I had read.
My old setup had a Samsung 850 EVO 256gb SATA6 drive as the primary boot/gaming drive. It seemed plenty fast but it had become too small for my needs, so this seemed like a good opportunity to buy a new SSD. I originally thought the NVMe drives would be out of my price range, but I bought the Intel 600p 512GB drive for only $10 more than I would have paid for a premium SATA6 drive. Though the 600p is without doubt the SLOWEST NVMe drive out there, it has 3x the read speed as the SATA6 drives, and most of what I am doing with it is trying to get quicker load times. If I was using it for professional workloads (as a video editing scratch drive, for example), I would need much higher sustained write speeds and then Samsung would be the obvious answer. I just didn’t want to spend an extra $80 on write performance that I’d never notice, and the 600p has been an excellent boot/gaming drive.
Ok, back to the Wraith Spire. I tend to have bad luck with the silicon lottery. My FX-8350 was not able to be stable above 4.4Ghz with reasonable temperatures. I was hoping I would be able to get better results from the R7-1700, since general reports indicated that it overclocked well. Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell how good of an overclock I am getting since I can find no good information about maximum recommended temperatures for this chip. Some people say 75c is the maximum safe temp. Others say 75c is a fine everyday 24/7 temp. Others say they are running it at 80c all the time without any issues at all. Steve at Techspot was getting 88c and 90c when overclocking the 1600X and 1500X using the stock coolers and without any instability – were those dangerous temps or totally fine? Nobody seems to know. I like my overclocks to be set-and-forget. I want to get it dialed in and then leave it for years without worrying that it will burn up or degrade or that in this or that application I have to turn back to stock speeds because of the thermals. Since I don’t know what max safe thermals are, I just have to guess based on stock thermals.
For stock speeds, the Wraith Spire does a good job. It is very quiet, and after a few BIOS fan-curve tweaks, it keeps the chip around 35-38 at idle, and around 68-70 on Prime95 (Small FFT, for maximum temperature generation). Incidentally, it also hits 70 if I run Cinebench a bunch of times in a row as well, so I don’t consider the Small FFT test to be totally unrealistic for the load this chip might encounter. From what I can tell, these are good normal temps. I can get 3.5Ghz by simply changing the multiplier and leaving the voltage at stock. This gives Cinebench numbers around the 1550 mark (roughly 6900k levels). Prime95 shows a modest boost in temperatures of 3-4 degrees C, and was stable even for several hours. If I push it to 3.6Ghz at stock voltage the system is unstable. At 3.7Ghz (the 1700’s boost speed for single-threaded loads) it is stable only if I give it 1.3v. While that is a totally fine voltage (AMD recommends up to 1.35v for 24/7), the Wraith Spire cannot handle a Prime95 Small FFT load anymore. I shut down the test and reverted the OC when the CPU read 89c. Given the fact that the Spire was meant to cool a 65w chip (and so probably is rated at no more than 85-95w), this is not a terribly surprising temperature – I wish I knew if it was dangerous. I have no doubt that a 240mm radiator or even a decent tower cooler will be more than enough to cool down my 3.7Ghz R7-1700. I am a little jealous of the people who just set the multiplier to 3700 and are good to go – lower voltages probably mean the Spire would be enough. But for me, it was not to be. I was halfway tempted to see at what temperature the chip would reduce its clock speed, but I didn’t want to burn up a chip I had just bought – might as well wait until I get bigger and better cooling to OC it to the 3.8-3.9 I hope it will reach.
Other than the OC temps it has been smooth sailing. Gaming feels more fluid than with the FX, even in games that I always thought were GPU-limited and/or running at 60fps with VSYNC on. Especially games that are sensitive to single-core performance (Heroes of the Storm is my latest addiction) there is a definite boost in 1% low and 0.1% low FPS. I have been using the Ryzen Balanced power plan from AMD and it seems to do a fantastic job keeping temps low when idle and letting the cores ramp up really fast when needed. I need to test whether the lack of core parking prevents it from hitting the 3.7Ghz boost as much as the regular Balanced plan allows. I think a simple CineBench single-thread comparison will do the trick.
I also tried streaming a bit – and it was able to generate 1080p60fps at x264-medium settings without being noticeable while in game. Later I edited some video of my kids – the final render speed was SOOOO fast. I am, on the whole, very happy with my upgrade. I get better single-core performance, much much better multi-core performance, along with faster disk speeds, and a more modern platform (with RGB lighting, M.2, USB 3.1, etc…).
Now if only I could find out appropriate temperatures…..
submitted by Morphon to Amd [link] [comments]

Budget recommendation please.

I am seeking a recommendation for a light gaming PC for my daughter. I have a corsair 400c case and a 550 watt power supply a rx560 and a ssd. Will be using a 1080 TV for a display Catch is I am paying in bitcoin. So have been looking at newegg combo sales. CPU ram motherboard combo. Would like to keep it cheap with a upgrade path down the road if she enjoys it. Would a current gen Pentium be OK for current games? Then upgrading the CPU down the road? Or AMD a better value?
submitted by shaunjeremystevens to buildapc [link] [comments]

Cooling system

Hello smart people of reddit again, I use my PC for bitcoin mining, gaming, video editing and streaming. My CPU (pentium dual core G4560) is using its stock cooler, what cooler should I get for it? Should I get water cooling or not? And also I'm wondering do you get GPU coolers? Or just use normal fans, (my GPU is GTX 1060 3GB) To sum it up recommend me a cooling system for this thanks :)
submitted by iDankCai to buildapc [link] [comments]

Is there a gas limit per block at which point a typical PC would take longer than 15s to process the transactions?

I guess Im wondering how long we can keep up the on chain scaling before people start requiring dedicated hardware to run a node.
I do feel there is a grain of truth in bitcoin core's assertion that on chain scaling can lead to centralisation. But only a grain- no need for people to need to be able to run a node on a raspberry pi (which presumably is already impossible).
Btw, the above assumes the main bottleneck is cpu, am I right? Breeding cats, for example, is cpu intensive but not bandwidth intensive. Or will my PC pass relevant calculations over to the gpu? If not - if it's all about cpu, isn't there scope for improvements here?
Finally- is it possible to equate specific cpus with specific gas limit? 'pentium X can be used to run an ethereum node with gas limit up to 200m' for example?
submitted by PumpkinFeet to ethereum [link] [comments]

Get my mining rig to boot, I'll pay you +$30 in bitcoin right now!

Whoever get's my mining rig to boot up and get mining properly, will be sent +$30 in bitcoin instantly from my coinbase account. I have bitcoin ready to be sent as soon as my system is up and running. Please take a look at the info below and reply with a solution! First person to fix my rig will be sent the bitcoin!
The setup:
MOBO: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer LGA 1150 Intel Z87 CPU:Intel Pentium G3220 Haswell 3.0GHz LGA 1150 PSUs: 2x EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 G2 80 PLUS GOLD Certified 1000W GPUs: 2x SAPPHIRE 11197-03-CPO Radeon HD 7970 3GB 3x GIGABYTE GV-R928XOC-3GD REV2 Radeon R9 280X 3GB Memory: 2x 4GB DDR3 1600mhz Corsair Vengence Other: 16x and 1x molex powered risers, add2psu adapter
I have three gigabyte windforce gpu's and two sapphire 7970 cards. For some reason I cannot get my rig to boot with 4 gpu's or more. I got my rig to boot into win8.1 a day ago with 4 gpu's but after restarting it, It refused to post again. I have risers on all the slots and have tried configurations with the gpu's in different slots. I have jumped the A1 and B17 pins on two of the 1x pci-e slots (last two 1x slots furthest from the cpu) and jumped the A1 and B81 pins on three 16x pci-e slots. I've tried configs with two 280x gpu's on 16x risers and with two 7970 gpu's on 1x risers. I've also tried three 280x gpu's on 16x risers and one 7970 gpu on a 1x riser. I've tried many similar configs but I have had little to no luck. Im using dual psu's with the add2psu adapter. They're the same evga 1000w psu's. All the risers are powered too. And I do receive 5 beeps as an error code through the mobo speaker when I try to boot sometimes. If not, the fans just get loud and the system never boots. All the graphics cards are plugged into the primary psu and so are all the molex cables powering the gpu risers. The second psu only has a single 24 pin cable being plugged into the add2psu adapter.
Working solutions will be rewarded! Thanks :D
-Ted
submitted by stoned_atm to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

[Help] CoolerMaster keyboard replacement

Hello /MechanicalKeyboards, i'm going to start of with a forewarning of the nature of this post. If I am in the wrong subreddit please direct me towards the correct subreddit where I can get some legitimate help with my situation. I apologize in advance with the length and the whining this post includes but I feel it is justified with my predicament. With that being said, I would like to start detailing the source of this problem, the quality of Cooler Master keyboards.
My birthday is on December 20th, and it was the beginning of December 2013, that I took a heavy interest into purchasing a mechanical keyboard. After reviewing and deciding between a few stray keyboard brands , I chose the CMSTORM QUICKFIRE RAPID CHERRY MX RED MECHANICAL GAMING KEYBOARD. After waiting for the prices to drop, I recall it peaking at ~$120 throughout the year but as the price decreased, I found my chance at $100~. At this particular time, I was excited for my upcoming birthday / Christmas present. I ordered the keyboard thinking I was getting a great deal and the price cut was due to christmas/holiday/end of the year events. To my delight, it comes a couple days later(fast shipping was issued, I think), and I plug it in immediately. Now here is where the start of my problems started occurring. As a programer and avid video game player, I expect every key of my keyboard to work especially if I am going to spend $90~ on it. To my dismay I found that the bottom left alt key was not working. I did not find it as major inconvenience until I started using the keyboard more frequently. After the initial discovery of the alt key not working, it took me a month to realize that I really needed the bottom left alt key. All my previous keyboard have only had the alt key on the bottom left side of the keyboard. Although the there was an additional bottom right alt key for my keyboard, it was particularly difficult to alt-tab with 1 hand, issue certain hotkeys with my programming, self spell cast myself (leaguer here), among other frustrating instances. I did try returning my keyboard right away through my retail seller’s “customer support” which was a complete shady website that did nothing but loop me in circles. After 2 failed attempts and phone calls with my indian representative, I gave up on the matter and thought ‘hey a broken key is not so bad’. At this point I realize I should of done a chargeback on my card or taken matters in my own hands and solve the issue immediately, but I had not done so and that was my mistake, that much I can acknowledge.
Fast forward a few months and I ran across this thread, [http://www.reddit.com/buildapc/comments/261vs2/cooler_master_is_officially_reporting_in/], I basically posted the ‘story’ above, and recived a repsonse telling me to send in an offical replacement ticket an eRMA. Through the verification process I found my keyboard had warranty until the end of this year. I had asked for a replacement but somehow the coolermaster’s main ‘website’ had changed dramatically and I had to request another eRMA to which it stated that I no longer had warranty. This time I was able to quickly resolve the issue by emailing my support guy that I have the verification of CM telling me the warranty was valid before the whole mishap of the website data being incorrect. This particular individual confirmed my messages and was able to send me my first replacement keyboard.
I had spent close to $20 for shipping/packaging/ and tracking but it seemed like a fair deal. The unusual part about this is when I selected the option of “what is wrong with your keyboard”, it had given me a list of several options, one of which that detailed my EXACT problem, bottom left alt key not working. I speculated that this retailer somehow gotten a hold of these “broken” keyboards and sold them for optimal price at the best timing. Nevertheless the idea went over my head and within a few weeks I had recieved my replacement keyboard. As soon as I opened the box, the space key fell right to the floor, a bad sign. I felt okay about it, I could just click it right in but something about that particular moment just made me feel quite bad about my purchase and whether or not I made the best decision. As soon as I start the typing test, I immediately find multiple keys that are not working and I demanded another replacement keyboard. I was so disheartened about the whole ordeal, I mean the replacement keyboard I received wasn't even new, it was refurbished and had a “TEST GOOD” sticker. This time CM decided to pay for my shipping, so I ship back the keyboard and wait almost 3 weeks before replying. This time I had decided not to pay for tracking, so I was unable to see the day by day shipping events, but I assumed the keyboard went to the right place because the shipping and return label was the same on the box the keyboard came in ( also used the same box to ship it out). While waiting for a reply I was being completely annoyed with “ are you satisfied with our customer support CM emails”, I had asked my support when and where my keyboard is coming. The following image, details that I was offered a replacement keyboard such as the CM XT, however I had asked for any other options and they had offered a TK, but it was out of my “replacement fee”. Once again, after I explained my story (two paragraphs above), I was so surprised that the lead support approved a TK for me. THANK GOD, I was extremely relieved that I was getting some REAL APPRECIATED help from someone other than a mindless drone trying to get at my money. He asked me to refile an RMA on the website which I tried to do so BUT the original keyboard of which I entered my serial number was “out of warranty” and the new replacement keyboard serial number was “already in use”. The reason why it was ‘already in use’ , in my opinion, was because someone bought it, returned it, CM refurbished it, ‘tested’ it, and sent it to me as a replacement keyboard. So at this point I have no serial number to enter into my eRMA.I emailed the the lead support back stating, that I had problems with verifying my serial on the RMA, the response I got from him was that he was all out of TK’s but he had red switch TK’s as another option. I didn't know what the difference was but I had accepted his condition. A day later he emailed me saying that he ran out of TK red switches and offered me what he originally proposed, a CM XT keyboard. Now I bought the CM QuickFire rapid because it was compact and it didn't include a number keyboard which added to its clean, minimal/simple, stylish, appearance. The XT that was offered was a bit bigger but the main reason why I didn't want it was because it had the USB input on the back right hand side of the keyboard as opposed to the Quickfire and TK’s middle USB input. This helps with the travel length of my keyboard usb input to my desktop which is currently resting on my far left. So… after all this time of almost 6+ MONTHS waiting, I was capable of waiting for maybe a couple weeks just so I could get the optimal keyboard for my setup. I asked him if it was possible if i could wait it out until a TK was available, and I was returned to my old support guy saying I was more then welcome to wait and that he would be messaging me when they are available again. After a few days of anxiously waiting ( I know its not that long), I kept receiving automated “please rate our customer service” emails, and just had to ask him where we were at this point, which in my mind it was waiting for a reply on whether or not TK’s were available. He had assured me he would be letting me know when they would be coming, although he didn't know when they would be coming. In addition to that he marked my ticket as “solved” and said I would no longer be getting customer survey emails anymore. Incredibly frustrated with the availability of TK’s, I searched for them on the internet and to my disappoint I was able to ORDER one from the main website and from retailers but I had not completed the order because my goal was to find if they were on limited quality or if they were bullshitting me. At the that particular moment, I just felt completely bullshitted on and that all my previous endeavors to get my rightfully owed 2013 birthday/christmas present was a failure. I was not sure how long it takes to find out if a certain keyboard is available, I would assume it would take less than 5 minutes to figure out why they are low in numbers or anything of that sort. I emailed them back asking if they forgot about me and 2 days later, my support guy said I was not forgotten and that he would double check to see if any TKs w/ red switches were available
That particular email was 3 days ago. Over the course of almost 8 months, I have paid for a defective CM keyboard, paid shipping on the replacement, received another defective keyboard (worse than the original), went through the painful process of customer support/tickets, and now have a CLOSED ticket with my issue not being resolved yet. The reason why I made this post was not to bad mouth CM support. My particular support guy and the lead support probably went through just as much pain as I did by politely replying to my emails and getting my issue worked out. However, at the end of the day I am a customer who had bought a keyboard but has yet to receive my desired product. People on the internet might say, hey its only $90~ why are you beating yourself up so much when you are obviously typing on a working keyboard, can't you get another one bum? To that I must say, yes, I am not financially stable, its impossible to compare any of the computer components I own to /battlestations, I literally own nothing and am in a staggering student debt living in a low income household.
CPU: Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU E5400 @ 2.70GHz
motherboard: default
memory: 2g x 4 (brand : Asus int , super talent)
storage: 1 tb WD storage
video card: gtx 550 ti nvidia
Bitcoin speed = 16 mh/s
This keyboard I wanted to purchase meant everything to me because my parents were the ones who bought it for me. I did not want to nag and say that my keyboard wasn't working, so I was content with just the alt key not working, but when I found out I still had warranty, I like anyone else in their right mind would return a malfunctioning keyboard to get the working keyboard that they paid for. So with that said my story ends here, i'm not sure where to go with this, all I know is the longer I drag this on, the easier it is for CM to say ‘we dont need to give you anything’.
TLDR;
submitted by JellyBeanSwag to MechanicalKeyboards [link] [comments]

Barebone options?

I am a bit short on free time so I can't do a fully system build, but where is the best place I can get a barebone mining rig? I just need the 1200w psu, motherboard, and cpu pre-installed. Thinking about going ryzen 3 route(for some reason I think this would be better than Intel celeron or Pentium in the longer run) and two vega 56 gpu(right now all I see is overpriced gpus) if the price is right if not one 1070 ti black and one regular 1080.
Related question do you think it's worth the 200-300 extra to have a company with a good warranty like CyberPowerPC to make my computer to ensure everything is working? I've done builds in the past, but most of those were simple builds a decade ago with e-sata one gpu, and old school Pentium cpus(when Pentium was the budget cpu to C2D). Thank you
What is your intended use for this build? The more details the better.
Replace this text with your answer.
What is your budget (ballpark is okay)? $2000
In what country are you purchasing your parts? USA
Post a draft of your potential build here (specific parts please). Consider formatting your parts list. Don't ask to be spoonfed a build (read the rules!). Wanting to do a bitcoin mining build(I know) CPU thinking 4 core Ryzen 5, maybe 6 core 5 if within budget 2, if possible 3 nvidia 1070 ti gpu(pref wit the faster gpu ram). Want to do 4 once total I have the cash. Asrock x370 Taichi mobo 8gb of ram 256hdd min
Thank you.
submitted by swimsinnachos to buildapc [link] [comments]

[Build Ready] $700 Aussie gaming rig

Build Help/Ready:

Have you read the sidebar and rules? (Please do)
Yes
What is your intended use for this build? The more details the better.
Gaming
If gaming, what kind of performance are you looking for? (Screen resolution, FPS, game settings)
Will be upgrading from a GTX 630M & 3rd gen i7 laptop, so not to fussed. 1600x900, high present preferred (really doesn't need to be ultra) at 60 FPS.
What is your budget (ballpark is okay)?
About $700
In what country are you purchasing your parts?
Australia, in-store at MSY
Post a draft of your potential build here (specific parts please). Consider formatting your parts list.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Pentium G3258 3.2GHz Dual-Core Processor $89.00 @ MSY
Motherboard ASRock H81 Pro BTC ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $58.00 @ MSY
Memory Patriot Signature 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $82.00 @ MSY
Storage Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $69.00 @ MSY
Video Card Gainward GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB OC Video Card $169.00 @ MSY
Power Supply EVGA 430W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $49.00 @ MSY
Optical Drive Samsung SATA 22x Black DVD RW $18.00 @ MSY
Monitor Acer K202HQL 60Hz 19.5" Monitor $109.00 @ MSY
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $672.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-04-28 18:19 EST+1000
Plus a cheap $29 case: http://www.msy.com.au/saonline/pc-components/13862-shaw-gt-gm5-gt-gaming-five-gaming-usb30-tower-case-without-psu.html
Getting from MSY since I can just pick it up locally and their prices are better than the others listen on PC Part Picker (though for some reason they don't list MSY)
Provide any additional details you wish below.
Going with the G3258 over an i3 because after doing some research, for most games not multi core optimized the performance gains are very small. And a lot of the tests I have seen were comparing them at 1920x1080 @ Ultra or high settings. I'll be at 1600x900 @ High settings so I think I should be able to get at least a solid 60 FPS on most modern games?
Went with the 750 Ti as I honestly just prefer Nvidia over AMD/ATI and the lower power consumption, heat, noise ain't bad over the ATI equivalent.
I know I could go with a lower PSU using a 750 Ti (think 300W maybe?) but they only cheaper ones MSY has are these very weird looking brands ($19 for 685W? lol no thanks) and I just want to pick everything up in one go.
Will be my first system build in at at least 5 years. Overall I think its pretty good for that price and considering i'm upgrading from a laptop, I'm sure I will be amazed at just about anything. Also leaves some room to upgrade to an i3/i5/i7 and a better video card in the future.
And no I wont be doing any bitcoin mining (bitcoin mobo, bitcoin suited video card..)
submitted by thehydralisk to buildapc [link] [comments]

[USA-TX] [H] ASUS X99 Pro Mobo, Late-2011 Upgraded MBP 13", ASUS ROG Gaming Laptop, HDDs, SSDs, H100i GTX, and Others! [W] PayPal, Offers

Hello everyone. Looking to sell some computers and components! Decided to finally put up some of the hardware I no longer need!
I will accept PayPal, trades, and Bitcoin. If you use a different service, message me! I'm specifically looking to trade for a new SSD, keyboards/mice, and external hard drives, but I am entertaining trades of all kinds. Message me or comment below if you have any questions.
Imgur Album link!
* Intel 535 Series 2.5" 180GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) SSDSC2BW180H601 - OEM - Used for around 2 months. Was the primary drive in my InWin D-Frame Mini build, but after I decided to watercool my pc with a fully custom loop which means I could only have one hard drive installed. I still have the factory packaging for this SSD. Performs flawlessly. $85 SOLD
* NZXT Sentry-2 5.25" Touch Screen Fan Controller - Brand new, factory sealed. Could serve as an add on item. $18 SOLD
FREE SHIPPING on all items. I will ship the motherboard through UPS ground in a box with peanuts in it. I will ship the other smaller items in USPS Priority mail flat rate boxes or envelopes. Thank you!
If you have any questions and/or concerns please feel free to message me.
submitted by pman3255 to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

Tiny pc update

Back in February i was going about my business, buying bitcoin from coinbase when i noticed the little ethereum tab. I figured if it was on coinbase, then it was probably going to be popular for something. At the time, it was only about $5 a coin, so I bought 10 just in case it blew up like bitcoin once did. Lucky for me a few months later ethereum skyrocketed and I could afford to build my own gaming computer, albeit a budget one:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium G4400 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00
Motherboard MSI - B150I GAMING PRO AC Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard Purchased For $0.00
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory Purchased For $0.00
Storage ADATA - Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card Sapphire - Radeon RX 470 4GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Case Fractal Design - Node 202 HTPC Case w/450W Power Supply Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $0.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-04 14:33 EDT-0400
Here's the build album for the curious
After a few paydays, I was finally able to upgrade from a Pentium g4400 to an i5-7500, and the difference was amazing. And I was happy for a while, I was getting 60fps on medium/high settings in gtav and hitman. Nothing wrong with an rx 470, its a great little budget gaming card. A few weeks after that i noticed the gpu market beginning to go nuts. at first, I was hesitant, I already had a gaming pc and was content, but when AMD cards started going for twice their msrp (USED) I had to jump in. So, after a lot of hassle from PayPal and eBay, I managed to sell my rx 470 for about $150 more than I payed for it, and was extremely lucky in finding a local craigslist ad with an EVGA 980 ti practically brand new for only $250.
After adding another stick of 8Gb ddr4 my battlestation will be complete! Heres the updated build:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-7500 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00
Motherboard MSI - B150I GAMING PRO AC Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard Purchased For $0.00
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory Purchased For $0.00
Storage ADATA - Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Storage Crucial - M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Case Fractal Design - Node 202 HTPC Case w/450W Power Supply Purchased For $0.00
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $0.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-04 14:47 EDT-0400
And pics
So, thanks to the ethereum craze i have spent about $50 for the original build, $200 for the new CPU, and actually gained about $20 on the GPU Upgrade. I know miners get a lot of shit on this sub for driving up prices (and rightfully so, I know it sucks) but if it weren’t for them right now, I’d still be playing fallout 3 on my laptop with a core i3 and integrated graphics. So, thank you miners.
Thank you, guys, for all the help this community provides, and thank you especially users that scroll through the new posts and help unexperienced builders with questions that won’t make the front page. Any time I had a problem it was great to know that there were people out there willing to help, I would have never thought about getting back into gaming if it wasn’t for this sub.
To anyone considering doing your own build I would highly recommend it. To be honest, my favorite part wasn’t even getting the PC together and working; it was watching (literally) almost every linus tech tips video, every jayztwocents review and all the incredible builds that people come up with, to learn about each component, its purpose and choosing the right parts for me. It was a very satisfying and rewarding experience.
submitted by bach37strad to buildapc [link] [comments]

Tiny build update

Back in February i was going about my business, buying bitcoin from coinbase when i noticed the little ethereum tab. I figured if it was on coinbase, then it was probably going to be popular for something. At the time, it was only about $5 a coin, so I bought 10 just in case it blew up like bitcoin once did. Lucky for me a few months later ethereum skyrocketed and I could afford to build my own gaming computer, albeit a budget one:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium G4400 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00
Motherboard MSI - B150I GAMING PRO AC Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard Purchased For $0.00
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory Purchased For $0.00
Storage ADATA - Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card Sapphire - Radeon RX 470 4GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Case Fractal Design - Node 202 HTPC Case w/450W Power Supply Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $0.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-04 14:33 EDT-0400
Here's the build album for the curious
After a few paydays, I was finally able to upgrade from a Pentium g4400 to an i5-7500, and the difference was amazing. And I was happy for a while, I was getting 60fps on medium/high settings in gtav and hitman. Nothing wrong with an rx 470, its a great little budget gaming card. A few weeks after that i noticed the gpu market beginning to go nuts. at first, I was hesitant, I already had a gaming pc and was content, but when AMD cards started going for twice their msrp (USED) I had to jump in. So, after a lot of hassle from PayPal and eBay, I managed to sell my rx 470 for about $150 more than I payed for it, and was extremely lucky in finding a local craigslist ad with an EVGA 980 ti practically brand new for only $250.
After adding another stick of 8Gb ddr4 my battlestation will be complete! Heres the updated build:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-7500 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00
Motherboard MSI - B150I GAMING PRO AC Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard Purchased For $0.00
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory Purchased For $0.00
Storage ADATA - Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Storage Crucial - M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Case Fractal Design - Node 202 HTPC Case w/450W Power Supply Purchased For $0.00
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Case Fan Corsair - Air Series AF120 Red 52.2 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $0.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-04 14:47 EDT-0400
And pics
So, thanks to the ethereum craze i have spent about $50 for the original build, $200 for the new CPU, and actually gained about $20 on the GPU Upgrade. I know miners get a lot of shit on this sub for driving up prices (and rightfully so, I know it sucks) but if it weren’t for them right now, I’d still be playing fallout 3 on my laptop with a core i3 and integrated graphics. So, thank you miners.
To anyone considering doing your own build I would highly recommend it. To be honest, my favorite part wasn’t even getting the PC together and working; it was watching (literally) almost every linus tech tips video, every jayztwocents review and all the incredible builds that people come up with, to learn about each component, its purpose and choosing the right parts for me. It was a very satisfying and rewarding experience.
submitted by bach37strad to pcmasterracents [link] [comments]

[GAMESTAR] Intel Pentium 4 + Lüfter einbauen Can we use a Pentium 4 with Windows 10? - YouTube How To Mine Bitcoin On Your CPU And GPU For Free Using Intel Pentium 4 in 2018 Free Bitcoin Mining - CPU GPU Mining Software

8-bit, ASIC, Bitcoin, Bitcoin mining, CPU, GPU, GUI, Hashrate, Ken Shirriff, N-Featured, Raspberry Pi, SHA256 Use Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash to play online casino games here . Show comments Pentium 4 (~1GHz) processor and (maybe 256-)512 MBs or RAM. Can I use this computer as a base for a simple mining machine if I can just put in a decent GPU?? I'm just strolling the internet for second-hand GPUs and asking friends, but I cannot afford to invest too much in it, so I'd like to be able to use that desktop for my setup. CompuBench 1.5 Bitcoin mining and 4 more. Performance per Watt. How efficiently does the processor use electricity? Pentium 4 560. 5.0. Celeron 900. 5.2. Core2 Duo T6600 . 5.2. Sky Diver, Cloud Gate, CompuBench 1.5 Bitcoin mining and 11 more. Value. Are you paying a premium for performance? Pentium 4 560. n.d. Celeron 900. n.d. Core2 Duo T6600. n.d. Sky Diver, Cloud Gate, CompuBench 1.5 ... You can't just buy a new CPU and plug it into your existing motherboard, as the Pentium 4 is based on a different interface than that used for Pentium III and Celeron processors, and therefore requires a new motherboard. Your power supply may also not be up to par, which will require you to fork out a few more dollars once again, but more on that later. In essence, moving from a Pentium III ... Interestingly enough, a Pentium 4 PC was capable of mining more than 100 BTC back in 2010. Nevertheless, this has totally changed due to multiple factors, including the rise in network difficulty of most cryptocurrencies and the advent of complex ASIC miners. This rendered the vast majority of cryptocurrencies impossible to mine using a PC, a single graphics card, or GPU in 2020.

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[GAMESTAR] Intel Pentium 4 + Lüfter einbauen

With one button your can start mining bitcoins! Easy bitcoin address setup. Every 4-5 days you can withdraw your mined bitcoins. No fees! Get massive hashing... Nicehash Multi CPU / GPU Cryptocoin Miner & Benchmark Software - Duration: 14:45. ... Easiest Way To Mine Bitcoin - Beginners Guide Into Crypto Currency Mining - NiceHash Miner Legacy - Duration ... i7 CPU einsetzen: Intel Sockel 1150 / Prozessor einbauen Tutorial auch für i3, i5, Pentium & Celeron - Duration: 4:39. Yogis Technik-Ecke 44,663 views The Pentium 4 gets a lot of hate, but I love it. In this video I built a Pentium 4 machine and see how it does with typical tasks that I do on a daily basis.... Can you still use a pentium 4 in 2016? - Duration: 0:10. me lastname 766 views. 0:10 "The truth about mobile phone and wireless radiation" -- Dr Devra Davis - Duration: 1:01:30. ...

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